THE ONLY ONES – Another Girl, Another Planet: The Best Of

THE ONLY ONES
ANOTHER GIRL, ANOTHER PLANET: THE BEST OF

(Sony)
Another girl, another cash-in. Hold out for the box-set, kids.
3½/5
The languid decadence of Peter Perrett‘s 1970s band made for some of British rock music‘s headiest moments, not least this compilation’s title track. Arguably the greatest hit record that never was, ’Another Girl…’ was a consummate three-minute cardiac rush that still brings up the hairs on the back of the neck to this day. That said, we’ve already seen a perfectly fine Only Ones ’Best Of’ in ‘The Immortal Story’, which offered a superior track selection and showed a whole lot more effort with regard to the band’s rarities than this set. Don’t get me wrong, I shouldn’t complain about 21 Only Ones tracks in any shape or form, but there’s a strong whiff of ‘Let’s capitalise on that mobile ad/tenuous Shamblin’ Pete associations’ here, which hardly does the band justice and raises the hackles somewhat. It’s also worth pointing out that you can pick up the complete CBS recordings for around a tenner without looking too hard. Nice try.
Hugh Gadjit

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VARIOUS ARTISTS – The Big Stiff Box Set



VARIOUS ARTISTS
THE BIG STIFF BOX SET

(Salvo)
Essential punk and new wave box set.
4/5
Stiff Records will go down in history as the most important UK independent label ever. During its thirty years the Stiff staff have released some of the most legendary punk and new wave records of all time. Started by Dave Robinson and Jake Riviera in 1976 on the back of the then-booming pub rock scene, Stiff’s early releases were pretty standard R&B, like Nick Lowe and Lew Lewis, but it was the birth of punk that blew them into orbit. They released The Damned’s ‘New Rose’, the first-ever punk single, following it with hits from the likes of Ian Dury, The Adverts, The Members, Lene Lovich and US whackos Devo. Embracing new wave, they launched the careers of Elvis Costello, Tenpole Tudor (and the excellent Swords Of A Thousand Men), Theatre Of Hate, The Belle Stars, Plasmatics and Any Trouble before moving into ska with Madness’s ‘One Step Beyond’ and giving us the folk punk of the first Pogues records. Along with the ska/soul of America’s The Untouchables, mod sounds like Makin’ Time and The Prisoners, Stiff covered every cool musical revolution first – and with style. Recently reactivated with their latest signings The Tranzmitors and The Producers (included here), this is a hundred track slice of punk and new wave history, complete with 68 page book. Their motto was “If it ain’t Stiff it ain’t worth a fuck’. Long may they remain Stiff!
El Prez
 

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ANTI-NOWHERE LEAGUE – The Road To Rampton

ANTI-NOWHERE LEAGUE
THE ROAD TO RAMPTON

(Nowhere)
The League’s first album on their own label.
3/5
Of course Tunbridge Wells’ wildest export (not much competition, surely?) have been knocking around since the UK82 boom, and cut a swathe through lesser mortals of the time with a mixture of biker/punk garb, pumping delivery and uncompromising attitude, particularly on ‘So What’, replete with a diatribe of filthy lyrics that backed their fine cover of Ralph MacTells’ ‘Streets Of London’ that made the UK chart in 1982 and would have risen higher if the Obscene Publications Squad hadn’t stepped in. To cut a long story short, the League continued, eventually moving into rather bad metal territory, but eventually saw the error of their ways, and these days purvey a decent enough mixture of rock-tinged punk. Or is that punk-tinged rock? Yes, I think so. And that’s just what you get on ‘The Road To Rampton’, the League’s first album on their own label, and if you pick up the limited edition you can also cop a second DVD disc with a rather swish video for ‘Mother…You’re A Liar’.
Shane Baldwin

 

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THE BUSINESS – The Truth The Whole Truth And Nothing But The Truth

THE BUSINESS
THE TRUTH THE WHOLE TRUTH AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH

(Captain Oi!)
Second comeback album from oi! originals
4/5
Strange to think that an album by the Business can be a decade old but still considered among their ‘new’ material, but that’s what happens when bands split and reform. After calling it a day in 1988, the band got back on the recording trail with the fine ‘Keep The Faith’ album in 1994, and built on it, taking deserved advantage of the respect shown by fans and new street punk outfits like Rancid, and even Blink 182. They apparently met up with the latter, and got on well, but understandably had more in common with the former, so it came as no surprise when it was revealed that Lars Frederiksen was to produce the 1997 Business album ‘TTTWTANBTT’ for Burning Heart in Europe and Taang! in the US. It was recorded at former Vibrators bassist Pat Collier’s studio, and the combination proved a winner, giving us a feisty album that stayed true to the band’s oi! and old school punk roots, but upped the pace a little.
Shane Baldwin

 

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DESPERATE MEASURES – Broken Bottles

DESPERATE MEASURES
BROKEN BOTTLES

(Failsafe)
Classic punk from Down Under.
4/5
New Zealand isn’t really know for its musical output of recent years, other than Crowded House and more recent acts like Die Die Die and Shihad. But back in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s it had a thriving punk and new wave scene. Desperate Measures hailed from Christchurch in NZ’s south Island and played a mix of Killing Joke style post-punk and full on three chord thrash. This combines their 1984 EP (the title track could have easily have been an early ‘80s UK band) plus a live in-studio set, where they tackle subjects like bootboys’ mindless violence and police oppression in catchy and feisty fashion. An interesting insight into life Down Under in the early ‘80s and the worldwide spread of punk.
John Damon

  

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THE DICKIES – Second Coming



THE DICKIES

SECOND COMING

(Captain Oi!)
Surprisingly sophisticated for the Dickies.
3/5
Despite being one of the earliest Californian punk outfits to make a real splash in the charts, The Dickies struggled a little when A&M dropped them after two albums, but bounced back with a third, ‘Stukas Over Disneyland’, in 1983. To say that the next five years were troublesome for Dickies singer Leonard would be a major understatement, but he persevered, with an ever changing line-up, and it paid off when the band landed the score for the 1988 movie Killer Klowns, released by Enigma as a mini LP. Rejuvenated, they followed it up with ‘Second Coming’, on the same label, and it was a more than worthwhile effort. Still humorous, but with a more serious musical approach, ‘Second Coming’ may have come as a surprise to anyone who only knew the band for their covers of ‘Banana Splits’ or ‘Nights In White Satin’, but I can’t imagine them being disappointed.
Shane Baldwin
 

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MOTORHEAD – Better Motorhead Than Dead: Live At Hammersmith



MOTORHEAD
BETTER MOTORHEAD THAN DEAD: LIVE AT HAMMERSMITH

(SPV)
Lemmy and company celebrate thirty years of boozing ‘n’ brawling.
4/5
Thirty years in the business of rock ‘n’ roll is no mean feat. Hell, Lemmy’s blood type is probably classified as ‘Immortal’ by now. Or at least Jack Daniels. Kicking out the jams before a packed-out crowd at Hammersmith (where the band pretty much made their name with the awesome live album ‘No Sleep ‘Til Hammersmith’), Lemmy, Phil and Mikkey tear their way through a twenty three song strong set of classics such as ‘Bomber’, ‘(We Are) The Road Crew’ and ‘Metropolis’ as well as ‘Shoot You In The Back’ and ‘Dancing On Your Grave’. Preaching to the converted (or should that be perverted?), the ‘head round things off in fine style with the double whammy of ‘Ace Of Spades’ and ‘Overkill’. While it’s not quite on par with ‘No Sleep…’, as live albums go ‘Better Motorhead Than Dead’ kicks the leather jacketed arse off 99% of today’s rock pack.
Jim Sharples

 

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PENETRATION – Moving Targets

PENETRATION
MOVING TARGETS 

(Captain Oi)
Long overdue re-issue of seminal North-East punk.
4/5
Way back in the late seventies there was a real holy trinity of female punk singers. The Ice Queen Siouxsie fronting The Banshees, Mrs. Styrene’s Polly screaming her way to success with X-Ray Spex and arguably the best, the breathy all possessing voice of Pauline Murray from Penetration. ‘Moving Targets’, the band’s debut album released in late 1978 saw the new piece line-up augmented by second guitarist Fred Purser who added his fancy fretwork to proceedings adding extra melodic colour to the bands earlier frantic driving sound. Throughout though it’s Murray who gains the plaudits, cooing and caressing one minute then spiralling upwards to the very limit the next. The combined result lifts the album head and shoulders beyond so many of their contemporaries’ period pieces. Add to this the bonus of the first two singles and you’ve an almost flawless collection of first wave punk.
Sean McGhee

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RAPED – The Complete Raped Punk Collection



RAPED

THE COMPLETE RAPED PUNK COLLECTION

(Anagram/Cherry Red)
Keep away from the guys with the funny eyes!
3/5
Yeah, you read that right, Raped. This dropped through my letterbox and my hangover immediately felt worse. The complete recordings of a pack of schmucks who slithered thru the newly kicked-open doors in 1977 togged up like a pack of rent boys (I’m guessing they may have known the territory), and announced themselves to a disbelieving public with the ‘Pretty Paedophiles’ EP (yeah, you read that right too), all tracks present here. Still, bad taste such as this is one of the reasons punk rock exists; it’s to piss off your parents (mine came round yesterday and I HID this CD!) and to provoke newspaper copy along the lines of: "a disgusted cinema manager stopped the Saturday morning show when notorious punk rock group Raped shocked children by using obscene language". A guilty pleasure indeed, but there’s a perverse kick to be had from this kind of cesspool punk trash; it’s shameless, it’s grubby, it’s very funny, and hell, these songs are pretty good if you can suspend your distaste long enough. If your mum catches you with this, you never heard about it from me.
Hugh Gadjit

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REVEREND ORGANDRUM – Hi Fi Stereo

REVEREND ORGANDRUM
HI FI STEREO

(Yep Roc)
The Rev unleashes his mighty organ.
4/5
Most of you discerning fans of all things ‘billy related will be familiar with Jim Heath in his Reverend Horton Heat persona but what you might not be aware of is his fondness for the sound of the Hammond Organ. The good Rev found a suitable jazz organist in Tim Alexander, and drafting in drummer Todd Soesbe they set about recreating those cool keyboard sounds of the 60’s. The overall result is a kind of acid jazz/mod crossover which does admittedly get a tad cheesy in places.  But they really pull it out of the bag with a ‘A Shot In The Dark’ (AKA Inspector Cousteau’s Theme music) and the coolest version of the ‘James Bond’ theme you’re ever hear likely to hear.
Lee Cotterell
 

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THE RUTS – The Punk Singles Collection

THE RUTS
THE PUNK SINGLES COLLECTION

(Captain Oi)
UK reggae punks 45 revolutions.
4/5
With the death of lead singer Malcolm Owen in July 1980, the short but meteoric rise of UK punks The Ruts was cut short. This singles ‘best of’ pulls together all their chart 45s like the mighty ‘Babylon’s Burning’ and ‘Something That I Said’ plus debut ‘In A Rut’, ‘Staring At The Rude Boys’, ‘Jah War’ and ‘West One’. Together with B-sides and the Captain’s usual informative sleeve notes, it’s a perfect introduction to one of the UK’s finest and most underrated ’70s punk acts.
El Prez
 

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THE SCOURGE OF RIVER CITY – self-titled

THE SCOURGE OF RIVER CITY
THE SCOURGE OF RIVER CITY

(Cherry Bomb)
Soon to be the pride of River City.
4/5
The Scourge Of River City have followed up their already big live reputation with a debut album of some quality. They really do have and eclectic mixture of influences that they absorb and regurgitate as an unrecognisable but distinctly familiar though hugely original sound. They utilise a double bass but don’t centre on it and they have a definite aural charisma that defies their understated image because it’s all about the music. Catchy choruses abound in an album full of killer and often poles apart tunes. There are hints of a Hellcat influence in there in places as well as glimpses of psychobilly but the whole album sure rocks and should ensnare and endear themselves at first attempt to an audience that won’t know what’s hit them.
Simon Nott

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THE SEX PISTOLS – Spunk



THE SEX PISTOLS

SPUNK
(Castle)
Classic Pistols bootleg repackaged.
4/5
The bootleg ‘Spunk’ album beat the Sex Pistols’ ‘Never Mind The Bollocks’ into the shops in 1977, much to the chagrin of Virgin boss Richard Branson, and just to add insult to injury, was probably a better set. Comprising of demos recorded by Dave Goodman at the band’s Denmark Street rehearsal room, Riverside Studios and Lansdowne Studios in 1976 and Gooseberry Studios and Eden Studios in January 1977, the results were raw, but captured the early Pistols’ fury perfectly. Here you get the album, with the same tracks as last year’s CD and vinyl reissues, but this time they’re all on 7” singles in a box. Unfortunately I can’t tell you much more than that as we just got a CD copy with few details, but it still all sounds great to me.
Shane Baldwin.

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SIOUXSIE – Mantaray

SIOUXSIE
MANTARAY
(Universe)
A solo debut that’s worth the wait from the former Banshee.
5/5
It feels like she’s been away forever, but ‘Mantaray’, Siouxsie’s first solo effort, sees punk rock’s former ice maiden creatively doing very nicely. Having burned her bridges with the Banshees, her main vehicle for two decades, the kaleidoscopic patterns of Siouxsie’s muse are still shifting, achieving rich fruition with ‘Mantaray’s sonic cross-pollinations. Into A Swan breaks several years of musical silence with naggingly insistent overdrive, coming on like T-Rex filtered through an eastern film score, Siouxsie’s vocals having lost none of their imperious grandeur. ‘Here Comes That Day’ retains the cinematic flavour, all stabbing brass and swooping theramin, while there’s echoes of former glories with the ‘Creatures In Loveless’s marimba motifs. ‘If It Doesn’t Kill You’ is a torchy slow burn, while ‘Sea Of Tranquility’ with its tabla-driven rhythms and swirling sonic plumes is a beguiling pleasure. Signing off with ‘Heaven And Alchemy’, Siouxsie drops her guard for some piano-led after-hours introspection; like a good liqueur, the song puts the close on a sensory sonic banquet, and one that’s done the former Ms Susan Ballion proud.
Hugh Gadjit

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SPEAR OF DESTINY – Grapes of Wrath / One Eyed Jacks

SPEAR OF DESTINY
GRAPES OF WRATH 3/5 / ONE EYED JACKS 4/5
Epic ‘80s post-punk rockers.

Kirk Brandon shot to fame when his goth punk band Theatre Of Hate crashed into the UK charts on the back of the single ‘Do You Believe In The Westworld’. While TOH only lasted one album his next band, Spear of Destiny, fared a lot better and are still playing on and off today. Their debut album, 1983’s ‘Grapes Of Wrath’, was a much more straightforward rock approach, but epic in every way. Containing the chart single ‘The Wheel’, SOD were up and running but it was the follow-up ‘One Eyed Jacks’ that saw them hit their stride. Chart anthems like ‘Liberator’ and the soaring ‘Prisoner Of Love’ smashed into the charts off the back of Brandon’s majestic voice, howling saxophone and super tight five-piece band. Kirk Brandon’s voice survives as strong as ever today and live he’s still a real force to be reckoned with. Highly recommended.
El Prez

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THE UNDERTONES – Dig Yourself Deep

THE UNDERTONES
DIG YOURSELF DEEP
(Cooking Vinyl)
Cracking new album from Irish punk maestros.
4/5
When The Undertones returned to the fray without original singer Feargal Sharkey, a good number of eyebrows were raised – not due to anyone doubting the abilities of the other members, but because his shrill vibrato delivery was so distinctive. The unenviable task of filling the Sharkey shoes went to Paul McLoone, but he quickly convinced the doubters, perfectly fitting in with the right pitch and tone, but avoiding what could have been an embarrassing parody of his predecessor. The Undertones’ 2003 album ‘Get What You Need’ was well received, as have been many live shows, and ‘Dig Yourself Deep’ is even better. John O’Neill, always the band’s main songwriter, is at his best here, with many songs that hark back to the band’s early, goofy, love-sick material. Wisely, though, the likes of ‘Him Not Me’ and ‘Everything You Say Is Right’ are tales of more mature relationships and failed marriage, not teen angst. They still have the same affect though: fantastically joyous tunes with a bittersweet edge.
Shane Baldwin

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STIFF RECORDS

LABELLED

‘If it ain’t Stiff it ain’t worth a fuck!’ Just one of the enduring slogans from England’s greatest-ever independent record label STIFF, who introduced the UK to more legendary bands and songs than you can count.

Originally set up by Dave Robinson and Jake Riviera on a £400 loan from Dr Feelgood’s Lee Brilleaux in 1976, Stiff went on to sell millions of albums from the likes of The Damned, Elvis Costello, Madness, Ian Dury, Devo, Richard Hell and even Alvin Stardust! Renowned as predominantly a punk label, they released punk, new wave, ska, soul, mod, reggae and even calypso records. The label has recently been revived, without founder Dave Robinson, and has released new records by the likes of the Tranzistors and the no 1 album from The Enemy, so it seems Stiff’s days are not quite up yet. We spoke to Dave Robinson in his old rock ‘n’ roll stomping ground, Camden Town.

VLP: When you started Stiff Records you didn’t seem to have any rules, it seemed to be quite chaotic. Even the name Stiff – where did that come from?
“It came from the record company expression ‘To have a stiff’ which is to have a non-hit. So that’s really where it came from and then it lent itself to a lot of slogans thereafter.”

VLP: And of course the T-shirt still lives on, ‘If it ain’t stiff…’
“Yeah, the T-shirt is good. It’s been put out by a lot people.

VLP: You didn’t seem to have any rules when you started – you were just trying things out.
“Well, we were managers, we had groups, myself and Jake, when we started. We managed several groups and then we decided to make a label because we thought the major labels were crap – their idea of marketing was you would go out and tour forever and then maybe if the public discovered you the record label would get behind you, rather then the other way around, which is what we thought should happen. There was a great environment for promoting new music. Radio 1 at that time was actually prepared to put the oddest music on. 1 could be playing on the daytime playlist in a couple of weeks. There were five newspapers, weeklies, and so if you needed information or anything that was going on there was a great media format for the promotion of good music but the major record companies didn’t seem to have any attitude about it.”

VLP: You did The Stiff Tour, which was quite legendary. Who was on that and how did you do it?
“Elvis Costello, Ian Dury, Nick Lowe and Wreckless Eric, those were the people involved. Dave Edmunds was playing with Nick Lowe and Larry Wallace was playing with the Pink Fairies who played with Nick Lowe as well. It was a very diverse musical evening and the idea essentially was that the package tour was big in England. When you had a hit in the ‘60s you were automatically added to the package to go around the country. You might just have one number, or you might have two numbers, or if you have a couple of hits you might get twelve minutes. It’s a diverse way in taking part in quite a lot of music and the universities in particular loved it. It was a great format. The universities were also excellent because they had funding from the Labour Government, society subsidizing it to a degree, and so they were able to get some very good music. And of course, you could play at a university and your audience was spreading all over the country as soon as they went home. It was a good time. I think that’s really what it was about. The majors weren’t doing it, so we decided we could do it and show people we were up for it. ”

VLP: And how crazy were The Damned for you?
“They were great fun. They were pretty naughty but they were a lot of fun. They were humorous people and I found over the years that we signed a lot of bands that had a sense of humour in their sound. The ones that took themselves super-seriously and thought that everything they did was phenomenal were always very difficult to get along with, kind of the demons of the business. Always been a pain in the arse. We have people who play good music but also didn’t take themselves completely seriously so there was an era of humour and interest around the place. Comedy, which I always thinks makes the difficult work of making a living from music much easier.”

VLP: Besides breaking a lot of the early punk artists you signed Madness, and then you moved on to things like The Pogues.
“It’s quite a cross section of music really. Anyone who was good we signed. That was the essence of it all, the actual style was up to the individual, but as long as they could write good songs and we thought the general public would take to them we put them on.”

VLP: Fantastic. Out of all the records you released is there any you rate as your finest?
“Well I think one of the best records we ever put out was certainly ‘Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick’ by Ian Dury. When you think of the sax solo on that record and a few other musical elements it is fairly unusual even now to have that.”

VLP: Are you involved with the resurrection of Stiff Records?
“No I have nothing to do with it. I’m promoting this box set (‘The Big Stiff Box Set’).”

VLP: What are you up to at the moment?
“I’m doing some work for a couple labels in the States, quite a bit of Caribbean music of all kinds. This box set, plus I’ve started a new record label myself called Download Records, and I’m starting to look around for things to go on that. So I’m still busy at night, out getting drunk.”

‘The Big Stiff Box Set’ is out now on Salvo.

SINGLED OUT
The best singles from Stiff

THE DAMNED – New Rose (1976)
ELVIS COSTELLO – Watching The Detectives (1977)
WRECKLESS ERIC – Whole Wide World (1977)
LENE LOVICH – Lucky Number (1978)
IAN DURY & THE BLOCKHEADS – Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick (1978)
MADNESS – One Step Beyond (1979)
THE PLASMATICS – Butcher Baby (1980)
TENPOLE TUDOR – Swords Of A Thousand Men (1981)
KING KURT – Destination Zulu Land (1983)
THE POGUES – Dirty Old Town (1985)

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BAD BRAINS

PAID IN FULL

At least on paper this just does not work: An all black, all Rastafarian band playing a mixture of the most furious – and pioneering – hardcore punk blended with righteous dub and soulful reggae? Surely not. Yet almost thirty years ago on the crazy, go-going streets of Washington DC, just such a beast, named BAD BRAINS, first reared its dread upholstered head…

Fronted by HR (Paul Hudson to his mum) with brother Earl pounding skins, Dr. Know (aka Gary Miller) on guitar and a Mr. Darryl Aaron Jenifer on bass duties, the Bad Brains were, in short, awe inspiring. Initially formed – during the early 1970s – as a jazz-fusion outfit called Mind Power, these brothers in innovation were unsurprisingly shocked into action by those nascent punk pioneers on both sides of the Atlantic. Taking their moniker from an early Ramones track and peddling guitar-driven hardcore at previously unheard of velocities, a shocked US East Coast scene soon began to sit up and take notice. Speed wasn’t everything but, back then, it certainly helped and when coupled with the bass heavy trips into dub the quartet’s originality rightfully marked them out as genuine pioneers. Yet all wasn’t sweetness and light in their world. The problem? Only a select few could actually hear the Bad Brains play.

A legendary debut single ‘Pay To Cum’ (featuring what is, surely, the most energising guitar riff ever) was ultra-limited edition and even a self-titled debut album was issued on the cassette-only label Roir. Live excursions were almost exclusively limited to the East Coast of the USA (by now the band had relocated to New York City). Plus, a planned trip to the UK with a support slot to the Damned guaranteed was forcibly canned when the band were refused work permits.

Luckily, a chance to catch Bad Brains during this period – their finest hour, according to some – has recently arisen in the shape of the ‘Live At CBGB’s 1982’ DVD. Raw, fast and intense (and featuring some classic old school crowd slamming alongside nineteen choice musical cuts) it makes for fascinating viewing. Tensions on (and off) stage blatantly run sky-high and, taking this and various other factors into account, common consensus dictates it’s a minor miracle 1983’s second album, the majestic ‘Rock For Light’, ever saw the light of day. Yet despite the hassles, every fan of loud, brash, fast hardcore should be thankful that said collection did emerge. It’s stunning. Produced by Ric Ocasek of new wavers The Cars, it really rips with righteous fury. HR is on particularly spectacular form, his howling vocals almost literally hurled all over the warp speed guitar action. Twenty tracks in around forty minutes and then…whoosh, they’re gone and the listener is left jaw agape.

However, it was around this period that HR (London born, would you believe!) opted for the first of many spells as a solo artist. As a result, it was a four year wait until fans got to hear new, equally vital Bad Brains material. ‘I Against I’ was the album, a blast of scorching metalli-punk, with the by-now expected dub blasts thrown in, that further cemented their reputation. Then, regular as clockwork, off HR trundled once more, brother Earl in tow, for yet more solo work. It was around this era that I was lucky enough to catch the be-dreaded one live, rocking a poky yet atmospheric pub in Leeds. Abiding memories centre around the air carrying a heavy, heavy vibe and an equally heavy, heavy aroma of weed (far rarer than today’s
‘tolerated’ approach!), the man himself rocking like crazy and even encoring with a rather athletic back-flip. Go rastaman, go.

With the Hudsons away, the remaining Brains opted to recruit original Faith No More front man Chuck Moseley to fill HR’s shoes for touring duties until (are you spotting a developing pattern here?) the original line-up reunited for 1989’s ‘The
Quickness’ album. Thankfully, they made it to these shores in support of that particular collection and rocked – amongst other similarly glamorous venues – a sweaty, heaving Huddersfield Polytechnic.

Then HR departed (Trinidadian replacement Israel Joseph I sang on major label debut ‘Rise’), returned for 1995’s ‘God Of Love’ album prior to his most spectacular vanishing act yet, instigated by fist-fights with fellow band members and untimely drugs charges. And that was, apparently, that. Hardcore pioneers, the premier punk/dub crossover outfit and one hugely influential band vanished forever.

Well, until word got out that they were due to play the legendary, CBGB’s in New York. Touring followed and their highly anticipated eighth album ‘Build A Nation’ (produced by Beastie Boy, friend and long-time fan Adam Yauch) hit stores in June ’07 to positive critical and fan acclaim. In January the band announced they are working on a box set of 7” records. It seems you just can’t keep a bad brain down.

‘Build A Nation’ is out now on Megaforce Records.

Steve Lee

INFLUENCED

Gogol Bordello
The Slackers
Sonic Boom Six

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